Online Banking

Our newest branch location – your house!  Enjoy 24/7 access to your account information, all from the comfort of home.

  •  24/7 access to your Lakes Community Credit Union checking, savings and loan accounts!
  • Schedule payments with our Bill Payer! (fee based on account balance)

Copies of your cleared share drafts are now available for free!  In your history, simply click on the the check number button for details, it’s that easy!  

The check button looks like: 

     If the check number is not displayed as a button, then the check has been converted into an ACH payment by the merchant and will not display.

Start enjoying all the benefits of online banking.  Call a Member Service Representative today!

 

Online Banking Login

Internet Banking

What Members Need to Know

 As internet usage has continued to increase, so has internet fraud.  Fraudsters have continued to develop and deploy more sophisticated, effective, and malicious methods to compromise member authentication and gain unauthorized access to members’ online accounts.  As a result, the need to protect your identity online has become increasingly important.  At Lakes Community Credit Union, the security of member information is a priority.  We are strongly committed to the safety and confidentiality of your records.  One of the best ways to avoid fraud is to become an educated consumer and we would like to help you in this endeavor.  Please take a moment to read this important information on how to keep you safe when conducting business online.

Rights and Responsibilities

With respect to online banking and electronic fund transfers, the Federal government has put in place rights and responsibilities for both you and the credit union.  These rights and responsibilities are described in the Account Information Disclosures you received when you opened your account with us.  You can also find them online under the http://www.lakescommunitycu.org/about/disclosure/.  Ultimately, if you notice suspicious account activity or experience security-related events, please contact the credit union immediately at 1-800-306-9740.

Requesting Member Credentials

Lakes Community Credit Union will NEVER call, email or otherwise contact you and ask for your user name, password or other online banking credentials.  We will NEVER contact you and ask for your credit or debit card number, PIN or 3-digit security code. 

 Assess Your Risks

We recommend periodically assessing your online banking risk and put into place increased security controls where weaknesses are found; particularly for members with business accounts.  Some items to consider when assessing your online banking risk are:

  • Who has access to your online business accounts?
  • How and where are user names and passwords stored?
  • How strong are your passwords and how often are they changed?  Are they changed before or immediately after terminating an employee who had access to them?
  • Do you have dual controls or other checks and balances with respect to access to online banking transactions?

 

Protecting Yourself Online

Here are some great tips from OnGuardOnline.gov, a website managed by the Federal Trade Commission, in partnership with several other federal agencies to help keep you safe online.

 

  • Use Security Software That Updates Automatically – The bad guys constantly develop new ways to attack your computer, so your security software must be up-to-date to protect against the latest threats. Most security software can update automatically; set yours to do so.
  • Treat Your Personal Information Like Cash – Don’t hand it out to just anyone. Your Social Security number, credit card numbers, and bank and utility account numbers can be used to steal your money or open new accounts in your name. So every time you are asked for your personal information – whether in a web form, an email, a text, or a phone message – think about whether you really can trust the request.
  • Give Personal Information Over Encrypted Websites Only – If you’re shopping or banking online, stick to sites that use encryption to protect your information as it travels from your computer to their server. To determine if a website is encrypted, look for https at the beginning of the web address (the “s” is for secure). 
  • Protect Your Passwords – Here are a few principles for creating strong passwords and keeping them safe:
    • The longer the password, the tougher it is to crack. Use at least 10 characters; 12 is ideal for most home users.
    • Mix letters, numbers, and special characters. Try to be unpredictable – don’t use your name, birth date, or common words.
    • Don’t use the same password for many accounts. If it’s stolen from you – or from one of the companies with which you do business – it can be used to take over all your accounts.
    • Don’t share passwords on the phone, in texts or by email. Legitimate companies will not send you messages asking for your password. If you get such a message, it’s probably a scam.
    • Keep your passwords in a secure place, out of plain sight.

 Who to Contact

If you notice suspicious activity on your credit union account or feel your personal information has been compromised in some way, please contact Lakes Community Credit Union at 1-800-306-9740 for assistance.

 

Protecting your Business Account

The Internet presents a world of opportunity — and computers are the doorway to that world, providing entryway for the bad, as well as the good, among us. Today, a network of cunning, organized criminals are engaging in cyber crime, netting millions from unsuspecting consumers and corporations alike.  The threats are global in nature, very sophisticated and often difficult to prosecute.  Often, these cyber criminals are in countries where the levels of security are not as stringent as they are in the United States or Europe, but their operations are as organized as any modern global business. In essence, a criminal “supply chain” has developed with participants providing stolen information, development of crimeware, marketplaces for software and stolen data, and direct attackers.

How They Work

With increasing frequency, perpetrators of cyber crimes are targeting business accounts, making the customers of Financial Institutions vulnerable to attack.  Cyber criminals dupe targets into providing sensitive information and security credentials in a variety of ways.

For instance, e-mails can be made to look as if they are from known entities, such as banks and e-commerce sites, and recipients of these e-mails unwittingly download malware on to their systems.  Malware can also be downloaded when users visit legitimate websites, especially social networking sites, and click on documents, videos or photos posted there.  Another problem: computer malware can go undetected for an extended period of time, passively monitoring financial websites for months before initiating any unauthorized transactions.

Malware that is unknowingly downloaded onto corporate systems allows cyber thieves to act like legitimate users, originating electronic transfers using online bill payment.  Entire balances are typically withdrawn shortly after receiving the money, and 90 percent or more of these funds go overseas via wire transfer or other popular money transfer services.  The problem is serious enough that law enforcement agencies, such as the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation, and such agencies as the Nation Credit Union Administration have recently issued several alerts to businesses and the general public.

How Can Businesses Protect Themselves?

Businesses can learn from financial institutions, which do a great deal to keep their platforms secure through the use of technology solutions. There are two levels of precautions. The most basic include:

  • Periodically assess your online banking risk and put into place increased security controls where weaknesses are found; particularly for members with business accounts.  Some items to consider when assessing your online banking risk are:
    • Who has access to your online business accounts?
    • How and where are user names and passwords stored?
    • How strong are your passwords and how often are they changed?  Are they changed before or immediately after terminating an employee who had access to them?
    • Do you have dual controls or other checks and balances with respect to access to online banking transactions?
  • Using multiple factors to prove identity. The use of PINs or passwords, combined with physical tokens or password-generated tokens, can be very effective in help to mitigate the risk of an attack.
  • Limiting administrative rights on users’ workstations. This can help prevent the inadvertent downloading of malware or other viruses.
  • Staying up to date with software patches. Using the most current firewalls, virus protection and spyware removal software will help control network intrusions.
  • To help safeguard online activity, installing spam blocking filters, using privacy locks to restrict access to sensitive data, and frequently updating browser and security software information.
  • Ensure your wireless network is secure and encrypted. Wireless routers often come with the encryption feature turned off. You must turn it on. The directions that come with your router should explain how. If they don’t, check the company’s website.
  • Change the name of your router from the default. The name of your router (often called the service set identifier or SSID) is likely to be a standard, default ID assigned by the manufacturer. Change the name to something unique that only you know.
  • Change your router’s pre-set password. The manufacturer of your wireless router probably assigned it a standard default password that allows you to set up and operate the router. Hackers know these default passwords, so change it to something only you know. Use passwords that are at least 10 characters long: the longer the password, the tougher it is to crack.
  • Know how to use your company’s resources for forensic and incident response, investigation and disaster and document recovery so that you can respond quickly and effectively to any threat of fraud.

The second, more stringent level of precautions includes:

  • Always being aware of the potential of internal threats. Conduct thorough background checks on new employees and periodically review existing employees.
  • Using dual controls — where one individual initiates a payment file creation while another approves it for release — to help control fraud.
  • Segregating accounts for better control. For example, collection vs. disbursement activity should be separated, as should ACH debits vs. credits.
  • Using encrypted mail for confidential, nonpublic information.
  • Reconciling bank accounts daily. Many corporations do not follow this practice, allowing the two-day return time to pass before an unauthorized debit is noticed.

 Remember:  The credit union will never contact you by any means to request your PIN or Password.  Do not respond to any such request.  Contact a Credit Union Representative at 1-800-306-9740, upon receiving a request or if you suspect that your Virtual Branch account may have been compromised. 

 

 http://www.onguardonline.gov